14. The Roles We Inhabit in Relationships with Sarah Walsh

episode description & show notes

Harriet is joined by Sarah Walsh. 

Sarah is an experienced mental health practitioner, specialising in working with children and families. She has worked in the NHS and social care alongside children and families with complex needs supporting their mental health and relationships. Throughout Sarah’s career she has observed the transformational impact of bringing creativity, yoga and mindfulness into spaces to promote children and young people’s wellbeing. She is passionate about joining these practices with her mental health training to empower young people to thrive in life.

Sarah and Harriet talked about the importance of seeking new experiences, the roles we inhabit in relationships and the power of good communication.

You can find Sarah here:

Read the full transcript:

SUMMARY KEYWORDS
people, yoga teacher, relationships, friends, yoga, families, oxford, nourishing, therapy, therapist, breath, feel, trauma, life, porridge, mental health practitioner, person, nice, Sarah, experience

SPEAKERS
Harriet McAtee, Sarah Walsh

Harriet McAtee
Welcome to In our experience, a podcast exploring the many ways of living well with Nourish Yoga Training. I’m your host, Harriet, founder and yoga teacher at Nourish. Today I’m joined by Sarah Walsh. Sarah is an experienced mental health practitioner specialising in working with children and families. She’s worked in the NHS and social care alongside children and families with complex needs, supporting their mental health and relationships. Throughout Sarah’s career, she’s observed the transformational impact of bringing creativity, yoga and mindfulness into spaces to promote children and young people’s wellbeing. She is passionate about joining these practices with her mental health training to empower young people to thrive in life. I loved chatting with Sarah; we talked about the importance of seeking new experiences, the roles we inhabit in relationships, and the power of good communication. I can’t wait to hear what you think. So do take a listen and feel free to pop us an email; you can find how to contact us in the show notes. Here’s my chat with Sarah. Hi, Sarah.

Sarah Walsh
Hey,

Harriet McAtee
Welcome to In Our Experience.

Sarah Walsh
Thanks for having me.

Harriet McAtee
Oh, it’s a pleasure. I’m really excited to have a chat with you. So we’re gonna get started as I do every episode by asking what’s nourishing you this week. And as I always say, it can be silly. It can be very serious. It can be very big, and it can be very small. And I’ll help you out by sharing my nourishing thing first. I don’t often share a food-related nourishing thing. But this week, I’m having a really fun porridge moment. And then you know, currently, it’s quite an unconventional topping situation. I was talking to somebody on the weekend. And I was I was like, Do you eat breakfast? And they were like, No, and I was like, I feel like you need to address that. But also, I have porridge, and they were like what you put in your porridge. And I was like, but were like, oh, so I at the moment and doing peanut butter. Obviously, because it’s me. And then, like I cut up dried apricot.

Sarah Walsh
Oh,

Harriet McAtee
I know. But so good. And then sunflower seeds, maple syrup and oat milk.

Sarah Walsh
Interesting.

Harriet McAtee
Yeah. Now,

Sarah Walsh
I used to get really obsessed with Leon porridge. Okay, I feel like I can never get a good consistency on the porridge. Right? Do you feel like your bass is good?

Harriet McAtee
I feel like my bass is good. I would say that my bass is quite personal to me. And that might I add chia seeds and psyllium husks into the porridge mixture? Which I think I’ve just acquired a taste for it. But other people would probably think it’s like slimy and gross.

Sarah Walsh
It does sound a little bit gross. But please send me the recipe; I’d love to.

Harriet McAtee
Yeah, I will. It’s it’s very, it’s very straightforward. But um, but I just can’t resist the temptation to get a little bit of extra fibre.

Sarah Walsh
You just like fibre, wherever I can take it.

Harriet McAtee
feel like fibre is gonna you know, that’s the reason that I’m going to live to like 120 will be fibre. There you go, but that’s my, that’s what’s nourishing me at the moment. What about you?

Sarah Walsh
Um, for me, we had some friends comes down at the weekend from London. And I think towards the end of last year, I was a bit like because we moved to Oxford in September. What have we done? Like, why are we? I think now than having friends come, and they were like, wow, this is such a great city. I took them to a mean, went to Hinksey lake and let somebody Sunday morning. It’s really awakened my love of Oxford.

Harriet McAtee
Nice.

Sarah Walsh
which is really nice. And so that, this week, I went on a walk, and I’ve gone running more. And I’m like, Yeah, this is a really lovely place to live. So that’s been really nice.

Harriet McAtee
That’s nice. This is quite a common arc. I will say for people that move to Oxford. Yeah, the first. Particularly I think if you’ve moved from somewhere like London or Brighton that’s maybe a little bit more exciting. And then you moved to Oxford. And it’s like, what do people do here? And I know that we’ve had this conversation before. Where there’s not much going on like there is, but it’s just different to what if you’re used to living in a bigger city you might expect? Yeah, but I’m so pleased to hear that your love of Oxford has been reignited, particularly because we’re coming into spring and Oxford in the spring is delightful.

Sarah Walsh
Yeah. Really?

Harriet McAtee
Yeah.

Sarah Walsh
Would you notice the difference? And I think lots of people it was the end of last year we’re just so burnt out. I just want to cocoon for a month, and now it’s more like, yeah, okay, I can enjoy where I am. I can go out more try new things. And that’s quite nice to like, get into that space.

Harriet McAtee
Yeah. I think as well at the moment, trying new things is something that feels really important to me, particularly after, yeah, being quite busy and not so much burnt out, but just full at the end of last year. And then I did nothing over Christmas; it was quite delightful. But then I’ve had a January of like people cancelling on me because they’re sick, or got covid or whatever. But so, trying new things, doing new things feels important. Yeah. But anyway, we’re here to talk about you, which is very exciting. So tell us, tell us a little bit about your background and how you would describe what you do.

Sarah Walsh
So I’m a mental health practitioner and yoga teacher. And what I’m really interested in, and I know we’ve spoken about this, as well as like, the relationships that we build with ourselves and other people. And that interest has really come from so my mom’s family therapist, and my sister also works in the same profession as me.

Harriet McAtee
So you’re a family of therapists.

Sarah Walsh
Yeah. It’s very intense family dinners. We and I think from a really young age; we had these conversations of like, who are we, how are we showing up in relationships, what might be going on for another person, which, as a child, is pretty intense. But it means this way of thinking about the world has been so much a part of me. And so then I started working in social work with children and then in the NHS, and working therapeutically with families, thinking about their relationships and their mental health. And I was really lucky to work on some projects where we moved away from traditional talking therapies. So I worked on one project where we took families away who experienced lots of difficulties; we took them to a farm for a week, which was very intense. We took them like herding sheep, picking vegetables, getting them up early and feeding the animals. And one thing I noticed from that was, like, we don’t have to talk about the problem for like things to shift in relationships.

Harriet McAtee
Oh, yes.

Sarah Walsh
So like, from doing different things from experiencing relationships differently, like change can happen. But those little projects were quite few and far between. So we also took families rock climbing, which was great. I think rock climbing as well can be another one that tends to be quite wealthy, quite middle class, quite separate. So we used to take families rock climbing, and then we went, took them camping in the Peak District for a weekend, which is so nice to have people, families that maybe had never left London. Yeah, be like going away experiencing new things.

Harriet McAtee
Yeah.

Sarah Walsh
And I think that’s what drew me to yoga as well.

Harriet McAtee
Okay,

Sarah Walsh
So I was practising in London. And I was really interested, like, how could this be part of my mental health practice? Could I share this with families? What would this look like? And after I qualified, we started offering yoga to families that we worked with, and no one came; it was purely staff. When you say yoga, loads of people are like, that is not for me. You know,

Harriet McAtee
I do know, yeah.

Sarah Walsh
So how we started to say, okay, movement. And then we were really fortunate in our building; we had a gym downstairs because we’re part of a Youth Offending Service that had a gym for lots of young people that came through them. So we started having, like, family activity evenings. So we did some gym stuff; I would do some like movement and breathing. We’d have arts; we ended up getting a pool table like it was just this wild—family space.

Harriet McAtee
Sounds great.

Sarah Walsh
Yeah. And then lots of people say, Oh, okay, I didn’t realise this was yoga. I didn’t think like, me, moving by body connecting and realising that I have a body, I think. And at the moment, I’m training in trauma-sensitive yoga. And looking back on my practice, I realised how many families or people in general really struggle to be with their bodies and their breath. Because it’s like, for a long time, not being with their bodies or not being with their breath has been a safe space. So like that disconnection brought them some safety, definitely, but then now trying to access some sort of emotional regulation or calm isn’t that possible, because it’s such a big disconnect? Yeah. And so, all of that kind of led me to leaving those jobs. Because those little nuggets of really exciting projects weren’t enough, they were kind of like sporadic and in between, and the main ways we would do things was quite a problem saturated and really like talking about people’s histories, which I think can be so blame, like focused, and I know my own therapy. I don’t want I keep going over things like it’s helpful to a point.

Harriet McAtee
Yeah.

Sarah Walsh
But what I found helpful is connecting with what my body needs, connecting with people around me and like starting to actually put things into practice to do it different. So I’m now teaching in Oxford, I teach Everybody Studio, and we love it. Everybody Studio. Yeah, it’s such a nice space. And it’s nice to find people that are thinking, I think really similar to you as well, like, okay, like, how are we thinking about yoga? What does that mean? How can we do it that’s really accessible for people. And I’m starting to set yoga up as an after school club,

Harriet McAtee
which is super exciting,

Sarah Walsh
really exciting. And again, having that as a space for neurodiverse kids, maybe kids with mental health conditions that can like come and access those benefits. But like, in a fun, creative way. I was chatting with Lily, who’s also a kid’s yoga teacher. And we’re like; you have to always say to people, this will look nothing like an adult’s class. Don’t be like wild with songs with like dancing, and like maybe some stretching, maybe not. And that’s great.

Harriet McAtee
Yeah.

Sarah Walsh
And then, as I mentioned, my sister also does similar work to me, from our work, we’re really interested in doing something together. It’s like she works in a similar area. And so now we’re starting to set up toddler and parent classes, to think about emotional regulation, and through like, fun, creative ways of doing that.

Harriet McAtee
Amazing,

Sarah Walsh
which we’re really, really excited about. It’s been like years of being like, how can we do this? This could be really exciting and different. Now we’re starting to plan and do things, so energising, and that was really nourishing.

Harriet McAtee
Hey

Sarah Walsh
Hey

Harriet McAtee
Nice, I mean, there are there are many threads in there that I that I want to pull on that I think are really interesting. Then, I guess the first one for me is what you said around, not necessarily needing to like tackle issues head-on. I love it because I think I mean, it’s certainly been true of my own experiences in therapy, in yoga in life that sometimes we can get, so tunnel-visioned around what we think our issues are. And I think it can be so tricky, like if we just keep rehashing shit over and over. And sometimes, you know, the way to navigate these things is to sort of, I don’t know, just go and do something else, like one. One of the one of the things I often say to people when I’m leading a meditation practice, and we might be doing a mindfulness of breath. And just as you said, breath can sometimes be quite a challenging thing for people, particularly if they’ve spent years feeling dissociated from their bodies or trapped in their bodies, like the breath can be quite a challenging focus point. So often, what I’ll do in this meditation practice is I’ll say we’re going to bring our attention towards our breath. And sometimes what happens when people do that if they’re new to that practice is they’ll get a reflex of like, Constricted breath, or the breath will get quite laboured. And I’ll be like, notice if that’s happening for you. And if it is, let’s ignore the breath for a little minute, like, let your attention be elsewhere like I dunno think about lunch, or daydream, or whatever. And then eventually, we can sort of circle back around to the breath, and maybe things will have changed. But if you spend too much time trying to control or thinking that you really need to do anything, then you just sometimes you can have quite a like opposite of the effect that you’re really going for. And this is what I find really interesting. And the trauma training I’m doing at the moment had a module on, like trauma and memory. And what like trauma research has been showing us is that the way the brain reacts when we experience something traumatic is like the thinking part of our brain goes offline because it can’t handle or process it. So the main way that the memory will be stored in our brain is through physical experiences and breath. So then, when we try and talk about something traumatic and use language, sometimes that’s not possible because the way that trauma memory has been formed has been without language, Broca’s Area, isn’t it? I think that’s what it’s called.

Sarah Walsh
Oh, interesting.

Harriet McAtee
Yeah. So I will fact check myself on this. But Broca’s Area is the part of the brain that processes speech. And in trauma survivors, it just doesn’t work particularly well. So it’s why exactly what you’re saying, like the memories are formed without speech. So you have a really hard time articulating what’s happened to you because you just haven’t. Your brain has integrated it in that way.

Sarah Walsh
Yeah. And so then the way we like traditional Western forms of therapy, or to talk about the trauma, then you don’t have language. And for lots of people there, they’re thinking, Okay, I’m finally ready to explore this, I want to go there. And then that starts like a cycle of shame because they can’t, and it’s not because there’s not a will or a desire; maybe it’s not possible. And I saw that a lot in when I was working in a family therapy clinic; families would really want to do things differently and would have such desire to be the parents that their children needed. But maybe talking therapies weren’t the best option for them. But within the NHS and social care, that’s all we really know how to do. These, like alternative ways of thinking, are seen as like, interesting, different projects, but it’s about talking. And I think, like, how else can we do this? And there’s so many ways that you can move through it.

Harriet McAtee
Yeah, I just think it’s so interesting. And like the the, I think one of the roles that yoga has really played for me in my life has been a way of processing and integrating like, without, without speech. It’s really interesting to me now, because I think I’m very comfortable with speech. I, I think I’m a good communicator. But that has been something that has come to me quite late in life. And I, you know, there was probably a shift for me. You know, really, I would say only maybe like, three or four years ago, where it really felt this like opening up in my ability to verbally communicate. But before then, I just hadn’t like I dunno hadn’t done enough, integrating hadn’t done enough therapy, I don’t know what it is. But now, you know, it feels quite open. But it is a sign for me that like if I’m in a place of dysregulation, I just can’t; I literally can’t talk. And I was in a relationship with somebody and like we would be having not necessarily arguments, but like, discussions, and he would constantly say to me, like, why can’t you talk about this, like it because it would just like what would have been something that could have been resolved now, perhaps in like, 30 minutes, would stretch out into hours, because I literally couldn’t. I couldn’t vocalise. I couldn’t put the words together. And for me, now, even to this day, it’s like, easily, it’s an instant signal to me that I don’t feel safe with somebody that my nervous system is like, ooh, this person is not for you if I find myself, like losing that ability or capacity to talk.

Sarah Walsh
See, I think I’m the opposite.

Harriet McAtee
Okay,

Sarah Walsh
I’m, and I think I do wonder how much of this comes from, like, being raised by a therapist? Talking and analysing is my like, jam.

Harriet McAtee
Okay,

Sarah Walsh
I can and but when, for me, there’s something I am what I’m trying to do much more like, how do I feel physically?

Harriet McAtee
Yeah. How does it feel in my body?

Sarah Walsh
Yeah. Like, am I able to have this conversation? And then I, with my partner, I’ll often say, like, the conversation that we’re having isn’t what either of us thinks it is because neither of us are connected right now to ourselves. Yeah. And like, let’s have a break and come back. Because I can, unsurprisingly, analyse our relationship for us, like I will take on the role of like, partner and therapist, which is so unhealthy, yeah, but it sounds really good, right? I can, like, talk us into a place like, Oh, this is, you know, genius. But actually, there’s real merit and saying, you know, let’s take a break and come back. I want to be connected to myself. I want to be like, able, because only through being connected to myself can I connect to anyone else? And I think that’s so true, as well for parenting, for intimate relationships, for friendships. Like, if we don’t feel really connected and grounded within ourselves. We can’t have those like nourishing relationships that we want.

Harriet McAtee
100% I mean, there’s so much I yeah, I look back, and I mean, I sort of look around at my life, and I look at the relationships that I have. And it’s always quite startling to me. I didn’t have a lot of friends growing up. I moved around a lot. Like I went to a lot of different schools. And I was sort of always the odd one out, and I think my oldest, my oldest friend now, is someone that I met at uni. So it’s really early, like 10 11 years. And I have the most incredible relationships, but they really have only, I don’t know. Like, I think I enjoy them more now than I ever have in my life. And it’s because I’m, like, more grounded and more connected in myself, like I feel more able to meet people where they are and with what’s going on. But yeah, I hear what you’re saying about, about that connectedness? Well, I’m going to ask a question, which is, do you were talking about how you take on the role of both partner and therapist in your relationship. But I’m guessing you must also do this in like most of your friendships potentially, as well. And I do this as well; I slip into like the coach quite easily. I went on a date with somebody recently. And it was we just went on a first date. And like, he was lovely. I just never wanted to see him again. But great,

Sarah Walsh
great first date.

Harriet McAtee
But he, I was asking him, like, what a great date, like, what does a great day feel like? And I said I was like, I’m aware? That’s a very yoga teacher question to ask, but like, you know, can’t help it. And he really, he really struggled to answer. He’s like, What do you mean? What does it feel like? I was like, what does it feel like in your body? He was like, I don’t know. And I was like, Okay. Probably, we’re probably not a good idea. But it was it was sort of at that point, I was like, Oh, you’re really disembodied, I was like, I’m not sure that I can do this.

Sarah Walsh
You want to find your person that’s like, Oh, my body, I want it to feel like this calm, or I want to feel it in my belly, or my do I really want to name it and be with it, I think for me, and I know, I’ve had this definitely through a journey of like, this type of work, my own therapy supervision. It’s like when my identity is only being the helper or only being the person that can have those kinds of conversations again; then I’m disconnected. That’s not like my authentic self. That’s a role I’ve taken on because of life experience. And I know in the past that has felt very fulfilling and quite unhelpful ways. So then it’s about having those friendships where I’m not taking on that role. But I feel that physical connection to myself; I have access to like a language that feels comfortable and natural. And I think also then being able to say; I don’t feel comfortable this conversation or known within myself, okay, this person is really seeking for me to tell them what I think from a therapeutic perspective. And I don’t have to

Harriet McAtee
Nope

Sarah Walsh
I think we’ve spoken about this before, like when people will like try and like, get a bit of yo coaching.

Harriet McAtee
Yeah,

Sarah Walsh
and you just let it land.

Harriet McAtee
Yeah.

Sarah Walsh
You don’t have to, like know, pick it up every time.

Harriet McAtee
Yeah. 100%. Yeah, I think it’s; I think one of the one of the consistent themes of my pattern in relationships is learning to allow space for people to step forward towards me, rather than me being always the one that steps forward towards them. And like, you know, I have been working on this for I’m going to say, like, 12 years in therapy, like, it’s still very much a work in progress. But yeah, not having to, I’d like that language used about not having to pick it up. Like just because somebody is like, waving it out. At it, they’re doing their like, their little like help me dance. It doesn’t mean, doesn’t mean that you. Yeah, it doesn’t mean that you have to because I think the thing for me is that I, It’s interesting. I don’t have many friends that aren’t also Yoga people, which I’m fine with, and I love, but when I think one of the issues that I have with non Yoga people and like non Yoga people, I wanna to be your friend too. But is, is I do have a hard time not picking that up. But then I get resentful because I’m like, I don’t want to be your yoga teacher. I just want to be your friend. It’s almost exclusively why I refuse to date people that do yoga. Because I don’t want to have to navigate that. You have no, no Yoga people, no Australians. So by rules, you know, it’s, it’s it’s h, it’s hard to resist like the siren call of somebody wanting help.

Sarah Walsh
Yeah, that’s so alluring. And actually then, but then it’s for me And historically, and I guess, you know, if you’re drawn to yoga, if you’re drawn to work in mental health in a helping profession, that’s a fulfilling experience.

Harriet McAtee
Oh, yeah.

Sarah Walsh
But then, when does it become the only fulfilling experience or that that is your only identity. And I think that’s a really fine line. And also to be able to say, with the most love and compassion, I can’t be your person for this because I have opinions and interests in your life, because you’re my friend. I can’t be your therapist. Like, I love the fact that I know very little about my therapist. And she’s this beautiful little container I drop into every couple of weeks. And I leave. Sometimes when she talks, I’m like, This is my space. When you use like holding everyone else’s story, I like she does, she’ll go on little tangents very rarely, but yeah, I do have that thought. Because and a friend can’t be that person, sometimes, but they also have their own like story and their own baggage that they bring to it.

Harriet McAtee
100%, I think. Yeah, I think it’s so I find it endlessly fascinating, like navigating those, you know, like, boundaries and themes and relationships. I also know very little about my therapist, which I love. I met her I so my current my current therapist, I started seeing them during lockdown, so I only ever had done zoom sessions for her with her. And then one day, I just ran into her Oxford, and I was like she was like your whole person. And I was like, your a whole person too, it was really lovely. It was a, it was really nice.

Sarah Walsh
That reminds me of when you’re a child, and you’d see a teacher in a supermarket.

Harriet McAtee
Oh, yeah.

Sarah Walsh
No, you exist only in school or my therapist. She exists literally on zoom in a little office.

Harriet McAtee
Wonderful.

Sarah Walsh
I wouldn’t want it. She is from London; it was a recommendation from a friend. So I quite like that there’s that separation.

Harriet McAtee
Separation is good. And yeah. No, it is nice. Or it’s like when like I think people a bit students also do this with yoga teachers, like we just exist on Zoom or in their classes, you know, in the studio, and then, like, they’ll see what the pub and they’re like they do a double-take. You’re like, Yes, this is me sitting here with a pint. Please leave me alone. No, I want like Students to please say hi to me; I’m always happy to see you.

Sarah Walsh
Yoga teacher is an interesting and a very grey area.

Harriet McAtee
The greyest of greys.

Sarah Walsh
Because, with therapy, I think it’s very clear. And well, I worked in London, which is huge. And I never work in the borough that I lived in. It was wanted to live quite far away from work. I didn’t want there to be any crossover. But with yoga, I think it’s a really confusing, like grey area of you can be friends with students. But then when you have private sessions, or you see people where you live like I think that’s and we’ve been talking about this,

Harriet McAtee
we have

Sarah Walsh
And we’re gonna have more conversations. What types of relationships are we having as yoga teachers?

Harriet McAtee
Oh,

Sarah Walsh
oh,

Harriet McAtee
so many. It’s tricky because I have friends. I have friends that have become students have become friends. I’ve had also, we were talking about this recently because you asked me a really good question, which was, do I find it difficult working with my friends? Because almost exclusively the people that work with me in Nourish like, you know, half a dozen of my closest friends that I’m in contact with on like, essentially a daily basis anyway. And I was like, no, like, I know, I understand, like, some people would find it really challenging. But for me, I, I find it more challenging to work with people that I’m not friends with. But I think it also happened gradually, which I think was really important for that shift. It wasn’t like one day I was their friend. And the next day, I was their boss. So it’s sort of it happened in different phases and different stages, which meant that over time, everybody was comfortable, but it’s tricky.

Sarah Walsh
My experience of you is that you’re very clear communicator, which I think is really helpful working together and being friends. So I think with you well my experience has been like you’re very clear and very like, Oh, I know were completely know what Harriet stands with this knows her views. And you’re very upfront, which makes it much easier, I think, which I really appreciate.

Harriet McAtee
Thank you. I will; I’m glad to hear that that’s your experience because that is literally what I try to do. Mission accomplished, tick. Well, I also just like don’t know how to be any other way. And when people like nothing frustrates me more than poor communication because it’s unnecessary. And it just causes so many. So many issues where it doesn’t need to.

Sarah Walsh
I, my sister, told me about this these do you know Gabor Maté. Talks about trauma, obviously, he’s really interested in that there was a talk that he did, and somebody he had on spoke about how an emotion that isn’t expressed gets stored in the body. And I think that’s so important. Like, if you have an emotion, you need to express with someone like with love and compassion, this is what’s going on for me. Otherwise, it gets stored and exists in your relationship in an unexpressed way, which I think is so important.

Harriet McAtee
I think that’s really interesting. One of the things that I often do with friends is that I’ll just like, I’ll just say the things that need to be said in the sense that or often I don’t know, maybe I something happens at work, or something happens with a student or I like I’ve actually students are a good example. Like, often I’ll have like a projection or like, um, some sort of response to a student that will come up and has nothing to do with the student. I know that, but I still need to, like, say it, I need to name it, and I need to, like, get it gone. So I have friends that I can go to when I can be like, I’m just naming this like I’m putting a pin in it. So I can like be free of it. In a sense, I think it’s so important. Because otherwise, it just sort of will come back up in a way that you weren’t expecting when you don’t need it to

Sarah Walsh
when you’re very vulnerable. And it’s like, hello.

Harriet McAtee
what do we have here? Fascinating. Well, so sadly, we are already running out of time.

Sarah Walsh
I know, how does it go?

Harriet McAtee
Just so quickly. But I would love to hear where people can find you what you’re up to, what you’re doing.

Sarah Walsh
So at the moment, my main place is accessiblechildrensyoga.co.uk, right? That’s me nice and simple. In the spring in East Oxford, I’ll be starting yoga as an after school club. So come to the website to find out more about that. And the parent-toddler classes with my sister, which I’m really excited for. Again, spring East Oxford.

Harriet McAtee
Amazing, it’s the place to be East Oxford. And you and I might be working on a little something as well. So for any yoga teachers interested in exploring the relationships that they hold, stay tuned. We have things in the works. But for now, thank you so much for joining me, Sarah. It’s been a pleasure.

Sarah Walsh
Thanks for having me.

Harriet McAtee
Thanks for listening to In Our Experience. Don’t forget to subscribe rate and review the podcast. We love hearing what you think, and it makes a really big difference. In the meantime, until the next episode comes out, why not check us out on our Instagram account @nourishyogatraining, or pop us an email via our website. See you soon

 

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